What month has the most divorces?

It's the time of the season for divorce

brad-pitt

January 10, 2017: For many years, January was widely considered “Divorce Month” by divorce attorneys who experienced a dramatic uptick in business immediately following the holiday season.

But, according to a new analysis of divorce filings and searches for divorce-related information on the Internet, March is the true “Divorce Month.”

According to FindLaw.com, the No. 1 website for free consumer-focused legal information with more than 5.1 million visits per month, searches for “divorce” and related phrases such as “family law” and “child custody” jumped 50 percent – from just over 10,000 in December 2010 to nearly 16,000 in January 2011, and continued to surge through March. “Divorce” has been the No. 1 searched term on FindLaw.com since January 2010.

Along these same lines, in an article by Findlaw.com the analysis revealed that divorces spike in January, continue to rise and peak in late March.

“While they’ve been thinking about divorce for some time, and taking steps such as obtaining marital counseling to save their marriage, many men and women may put off their decision to file to avoid additional stress during the holiday season,” says Ohnstad, who has more than 30 years of experience. “Couples with children may want to have one last holiday season together as a family.”

For others, the stress of in-laws, money troubles and career challenges coupled with the pressures to “be happy” during the holidays leads some men and women to cheat on their spouses during this time.

A study on holiday depression noted that of those who cheat on their spouses, 56 percent of men and 42 percent of women do so during the holiday season, says leading marriage therapist Dr. Bonnie Eaker Weil, Ph.D., author of Make Up, Don’t Break Up. These affairs may trigger post-New Year’s divorce filings by spouses who discover the affairs or by the cheating spouse who now wants to end the marriage.

Another reason that many people delay divorce until after the holidays is related to income taxes, adds Ohnstad. Your marital status as of December 31 determines whether you’ll file a joint or an individual return for the prior year.

 

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It’s the time of the season for divorce

brad-pitt

January 10, 2017: For many years, January was widely considered “Divorce Month” by divorce attorneys who experienced a dramatic uptick in business immediately following the holiday season.

But, according to a new analysis of divorce filings and searches for divorce-related information on the Internet, March is the true “Divorce Month.”

According to FindLaw.com, the No. 1 website for free consumer-focused legal information with more than 5.1 million visits per month, searches for “divorce” and related phrases such as “family law” and “child custody” jumped 50 percent – from just over 10,000 in December 2010 to nearly 16,000 in January 2011, and continued to surge through March. “Divorce” has been the No. 1 searched term on FindLaw.com since January 2010.

Along these same lines, in an article by Findlaw.com the analysis revealed that divorces spike in January, continue to rise and peak in late March.

“While they’ve been thinking about divorce for some time, and taking steps such as obtaining marital counseling to save their marriage, many men and women may put off their decision to file to avoid additional stress during the holiday season,” says Ohnstad, who has more than 30 years of experience. “Couples with children may want to have one last holiday season together as a family.”

For others, the stress of in-laws, money troubles and career challenges coupled with the pressures to “be happy” during the holidays leads some men and women to cheat on their spouses during this time.

A study on holiday depression noted that of those who cheat on their spouses, 56 percent of men and 42 percent of women do so during the holiday season, says leading marriage therapist Dr. Bonnie Eaker Weil, Ph.D., author of Make Up, Don’t Break Up. These affairs may trigger post-New Year’s divorce filings by spouses who discover the affairs or by the cheating spouse who now wants to end the marriage.

Another reason that many people delay divorce until after the holidays is related to income taxes, adds Ohnstad. Your marital status as of December 31 determines whether you’ll file a joint or an individual return for the prior year.

 

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JANUARY IS DIVORCE SEASON

Think before you jump or, in this case, file.

Divorce filings surge in January as people decide to start their New Year with a clean slate, helped by a stressful holiday period and, perhaps, even more stressful in-laws, experts say, with family lawyers reporting a rise of nearly one-third in business in the New Year. John Slowiaczek, president of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers, says he typically sees a spike of 25% to 30% every year in January. Similar trends are seen in the U.K.: one in five couples plan to divorce after the holidays, according to one survey of 2,000 spouses by legal firm Irwin Mitchell, according to Market Watch.

‘We don’t encourage someone to open their spouse’s mail. You can, however, look at the financial institution that sent the statement through the mail. If you give us those names, we can subpoena that information.’

—John Slowiaczek, president of the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers

Being cooped up in a house for several days when a marriage is experiencing serious problems — while dealing with the pressure to put on a happy face for the kids and visiting relatives — takes its toll on the most stoic of couples. “Holiday time is usually a time when we get a spike in consultations and retentions,” says Lois Liberman, a partner at the law firm Blank Rome in New York and chair of the company’s matrimonial group. “Holiday time is usually fraught with a lot of tension, emotion and financial issues, which is usually the trigger.”

“Never file out of anger,” Slowiaczek says. “Most of the decisions you or I make are intellectual and emotional decisions. The former are usually correct and boring, and the latter are usually dangerous.” Lawyers and counselors, he says, give very different advice and it’s important to balance both sides. Other mistakes to avoid: Don’t involve your children before, during or after the divorce, Slowiaczek adds. And don’t bad-mouth your spouse (or ex-spouse to your kids). And, if there’s a third party involved, don’t call that person, his/her spouse or children.

 All of these factors seem to make January a perfect storm for uncoupling.
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In 9 US states, a divorce means you’ll lose half of everything you own

community-vs-equitable-divorce-1

Estimates of divorce rates in America vary, but the reality is a great many marriages reach this unfortunate conclusion, and the aftermath is frequently messy, both emotionally and financially.

When a couple joins as one, their assets typically combine to form a marital estate, and anything they acquire thereafter becomes joint property. Upon divorce, those assets — including real estate, dependent children, income, cars, furniture, stocks, and retirement accounts — get divided between the former spouses.

Depending on the state you reside in, there are two ways your assets could be divided:

1. Community property: Marital assets — and debts incurred by either spouse during the marriage — are divided 50/50. However, separate property (anything held in only one spouse’s name, including property owned before marriage, given as a gift, or inherited) is not taken into account. The states that observe this law are Arizona, California, Idaho, Louisiana, Nevada, New Mexico, Texas, Washington, and Wisconsin. Residents of Alaska can opt-in to a community property agreement.

2. Equitable distribution: Marital assets (not including separate property) are divided by a judge with the goal to put each individual on equal financial footing, taking into account each person’s earning potential or income, financial needs, and personal assets states Business Insider

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